Ohio Bat Facts, Myths and Misconceptions

Face the facts. Bats typically get a bum rap in the minds of most humans. Maybe it’s because of too many movies about vampires, horror tales told around the campfire, and a general fear of things that go “squeak” in the night. Here are some facts about bats that you might want to bear in mind the next time you hear some old wives’ tales trying to instill fear in your heart and mind:

1. Bats are not blind. Instead, the bats found in Ohio can see, although they do also use echolocation to navigate and locate prey in the darkness. Echolocation is a type of radar that is not audible to the human ear.

2. Bats wish to avoid getting tangled in your hair at least as much as you don’t want them there. They are far more interested in the insects that are buzzing around your head. This fact may explain why bats appear to follow you around on your evening stroll in the backyard.

3.Bats found in Ohio do not feed on blood. They do not suck blood. Only vampire bats found in southern Mexico, Central America and South America drink blood. And even those bat species are not interested in human blood, preferring to feed on the blood of cows, pigs and other domestic animals.

4. Ohio’s bat population does not eat fruit. In fact, there are no fruit-eating bats found in the United States. All the bats found in our state feed exclusively on insects like mosquitoes.

5. Very few bats are infected with the rabies virus. In nature, scientists have reported that 0.5% of bats are infected with the disease. However, contracting rabies can be fatal. Any bites or exposure to animals must be taken seriously. Contact your medical professional immediately for advice.

6. Bats are not rodents. Instead, bats belong to the order called “Chiroptera” which translates to “hand wing.” Bats do not chew holes to gain access to homes. Rodents, on the other hand, are more than happy to gnaw their way into your home.

7. Bats are the only mammal on the planet capable of flight. Flying squirrels can only manage to glide, while humans depend on airplanes, gliders and all sorts of other technology to get off the ground.

8. Spring, summer, fall and winter — the season doesn’t matter; people can experience problems with Ohio bats in every season of the year. The solution? Contact your Propestmen Bat and Mice Experts today to humanely tackle your bat challenges whenever a problem may arise.