Summer Bat Activity in Your Ohio Home

The summer months — particularly August — are undeniably the busiest time of the year for our Propestmen Bat and Mice expert team, as we must actively manage our schedule to accommodate the hundreds of calls we receive in any given week. Priority is always given to those with bats inside their homes.

Beetles, moths, mosquitoes and all the other bugs that make our lives miserable are living on borrowed time when they take to the summer skies, thanks to hungry bats out looking for a meal. Bats swooping through the air are providing a valuable service to home owners looking to enjoy a backyard barbecue by helping keep the insect population in check.

But like any good neighborhood relationships, compromises are in order. When bats leave the great outdoors to share your living space, it’s time to call a Propestmen Bat and Mice expert for help. It’s the ideal time to have bats humanely removed from your home, since food sources are plentiful and young bats are now able to fly.

So, what are the signs you might have bats living nearby? Adult bats and juveniles alike are easily visible in the twilight sky as they fly erratic flight paths in search of food. The bats are using echolocation to locate their insect prey. Propestmen Bat and Mice experts arrive at your home equipped with high-tech bat detectors that home in on the bat’s radar frequency, to assist in locating the animals. Trust us … that’s a particularly attractive tool when a young bat is flitting around your bedroom!

Remember that bats are never intentionally trying to invade your living space; instead, they’re likely just looking for their attic roosts. Sometimes a bat will enter your home through cold air returns or some other opening. If you frequently discover bats in your home and you’re not leaving windows open at night, chances are good there is a summer roost in your walls or attic. If that’s the case, a professional bat exclusion is in order. Call your Propestmen Bat and Mice expert today to start the exclusion process, or you may find yourself co-habituating with a bat in the attic over the winter.

According to the Ohio Department of Health Web site: “Most of the human rabies cases acquired within the U.S. during the past 20 years were due to bat-strains of rabies. Since a bat bite is very small and may go undetected, the history of any potential bat contact should be carefully evaluated to determine the potential for exposure. If exposure occurred, the bat should be safely captured and submitted for testing.”