Mouse Diseases

Weighing less than an ounce, mice carry with them very real threats to human health far in excess to their tiny size. They are capable of transmitting — directly and indirectly — several different diseases to people. While most homes harbor mice occasionally, it’s important to consider the risks and eliminate any possibility of coexistence on a continual long term basis. Consider these threats to the health and safety of your family:

mice diseases

Salmonella (food poisoning) – Generally this bacterial disease is transmitted by rodent feces coming in contact with human food. Symptoms include diarrhea, headache and fever.

Ringworm – A skin fungus that can be contracted from mice. The affliction has also been known to be passed to cats, then to their human owners.

Dermatitis – A common skin irritation. One of the many different causes (beyond Ohio’s notoriously tough winter weather conditions) of the ailment stems from bites of mites living in homes infested by mice.

Tapeworm – The parasite can be transmitted to humans consuming food contaminated by contact with rodent feces.

Leptospirosis – Caused by exposure to rodent urine in food or through dermal contact via small cuts or abrasions in a human’s skin.

Rickettsia Pox – Characterized by a rash similar to chicken pox, this disease is transmitted to humans through the bite of mite infesting house mice.

Note: Your doctor knows best! The descriptions provided above are only intended to provide awareness of the risks involving the presence of mice in a human home. Any medical concerns regarding human health should be directed to your medical professional.